On Learning Objectives and Duct Tape

The other night, I watched a group of Boy Scouts plan a skit. Their Patrol had the assignment of teaching the rest of the Troop how you could make first aid supplies out of duct tape. They had the idea of doing a funny little show about a Scout falling out of an apple tree, and suddenly needing a stretcher, a splint and a sling. They threw joke lines and sight gags at each other, and put together a nice little script and demonstration.

But I noticed: at no point did one of the boys suggest that they should start their skit by saying, “At the conclusion of this skit, you will have a thorough understanding of how to manipulate industrial-strength adhesive tape for purposes of medical care.”

ducttape

 

 

Just sayin.

 

Everything I Needed to Know I Learned at Summer Camp (Part 1)

I’ve got a lot of summer camp in my life these days, and compliance on my mind, and the two keep intersecting.

There is a lot of the art of marketing in leadership, and in corporate ethics. One example is the knack of coming up with a few words to summarize and represent your company values. These are the isolated, boldfaced words that become section headings in a Code of Conduct, or paragraph titles in a Mission Statement, or that turn into an anagram in posters hung in the coffee rooms.

If you are in the market for those kind of words, you could do a lot worse than these:

Trustworthy
Loyal
Helpful
Friendly
Courteous
Kind
Obedient
Cheerful
Thrifty
Brave
Clean
Reverent

So consider this tribute to the Scout Law as my greeting card from Boy Scout Camp NoBeBoSco, near Blairstown, New Jersey, where I spent the last week.

6:45 AM on Saturday, July 18, 2009, in the Onandaga campsite
6:45 AM on Saturday, July 18, 2009, in the Onandaga campsite of Camp NoBeBoSco, near Blairstown, New Jersey

I hope you enjoy it. And remember to do your good turn daily.

(PS:  OK, I know you can’t use “Reverent” in most secular companies. And maybe you would only use “Clean” if you had manufacturing. And maybe you would like to use “Obedient” but you know it’s too medieval for an American workplace. But you get the idea.)